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Wednesday, Jan 16 2013 09:34 PM

Suffering burros saved

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A pair of donkeys roaming the area near Banducci and Pellisier Roads just outside Stallion Springs, is in serious need of help. The pair is suffering from a severe episode of Laminitis. Photo by Heather Liebman

A pair of wild donkeys roaming an open area Banducci and Pellisier Roads just outside Stallion Springs, arrive at Lifesavers Horse Rescue in Lancaster. Photos courtesy of Jill Starr/Lifesavers Horse Rescue

A pair of wild donkeys roaming an open area near Banducci and Pellisier Roads just outside Stallion Springs, arrive at Lifesavers Horse Rescue in Lancaster. Photos courtesy of Jill Starr/Lifesavers Horse Rescue

A pair of wild donkeys suffering from a disfiguring case of laminitis has been rescued.

Initially spotted in an open area off Banducci and Pellisier Roads just outside Stallion Springs, the two gained local recognition as animal lovers flooded social and regular media outlets asking for assistance in attracting the attention of Kern County Animal Control in an attempt to get them help.

Apparently it worked, and according to Stallion Springs Police Sergeant Mike Grant who also joined in the effort, the two burros have been captured by animal control and turned over to Lifesavers Horse Rescue in Lancaster.

"Animal control said that it just broke their hearts," Grant said. "The burros must have just been dumped off years ago."

As a result of numerous complaints and after thoroughly searching the area the two donkeys had been reportedly roaming, animal control officers were able to locate the burros on open land, making it easy to nab them after it was first thought they might be on private property. An issue that had delayed rescue groups from initially taking action.

Nevertheless, catching the duo still turned out to be tricky, so a local rancher was brought in two wrangle the pair, whose laminitis -- a complex disease that can cause severe pain and damage to the donkey's feet -- had caused their hooves to grow to nearly 24 inches.

The disorder is often associated with inappropriate feeding, and according to Tehachapi veterinarian Beverly Billingsley, can be life threatening and eventually can lead to death.

According to Lifesavers’ President Jill Starr a farrier is scheduled to begin lopping of the growths on the donkeys feet on Monday, and have already been matched with someone willing to adopt the pair as soon as they recover.

“They are surprisingly adjusting to their new surroundings,” Starr said. “ The are not sketchy and are coming along, even letting us touch them.”

Thanks to a community forged together in awareness and action, Kern County Animal Control, and Starr’s organization, these two burros, unlike others, got a second chance.

CHECK OUT VIDEO OF THE RESCUE HERE

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