Donald Barton was born in Dallas, Texas, to Kerby O. Barton and Ruby Barton on Dec. 11, 1931. He passed away on March 11, 2017.

Ruby died of cancer on Oct. 20, 1939. Donald and his father moved to Los Angeles shortly after her death. Kerby bought a house in Highland Park where they stayed until Donald finished school.

Donald married his wife, Dorothy Lewis, in 1950. They had four children: Don K. Barton, of Rancho Cucamonga, Daryl Barton, of Palm Springs, Della Barton, of Prescott, Ariz., and Dana Bingley, of Tujunga. He had two stepchildren: Wendy Mascarenas, of La Crecenta, and Christopher Baker, of Gardnerville, Nev. He is also survived by 13 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

Donald married Vivian Baker in 1984 in Los Angeles, and they lived in Glendale until moving to Bear Valley in 2003. He and Vivian did extensive world traveling until Don was too ill to go.

Don bought a bottled water route in Los Angels where he worked for six years. He then went to work for Laura Scudder potato chips until they closed. He was hired by Interstate Brands Bakery in Los Angeles delivering Weber Bread. He was employed there for 42 years until he retired in 2004.

Don played softball most of his adult life, playing on several tournament teams and traveling as far away as San Diego and Las Vegas. This was one of his greatest loves. He also loved motorcycles having owned one for most of his adult life.

A memorial service will be held April 9, at 11 a.m., at Oak Tree Country Club. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the Alzheimer's Association.

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